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Chinatown

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The first Chinese migration arrived in Peru in 1849, with 75 workers. Over time, many more came and those who managed to buy their freedom or complete their contracts of employment, were grouped in neighborhoods, where they were mostly engaged in trade and cooking. One of these neighborhoods, located in Barrios Altos, became their main roundabout: Calle Capón (Capon Street), which received its name because it was where pigs, bulls and lambs were fattened in order to have better meat.
It was in Calle Capón where the Limeños got in direct contact with Chinese culture, culinary and art as the Chinese brought with them their culinary, dances, customs, religion, traditional medicine and Oriental philosophy. The largest and most important Cantonese settlement of of the country and of South America was located in Lima.
In 1971, the China Gate was inaugurated, designed by architect Kuoway Ruiz and donated by the government of Taiwan. The archway is the gate that leads to Calle Capon Street, which spans blocks 7 and 8 of the Jiron Andahuaylas.

  • Barrio Chino
  • Barrio Chino
  • Barrio Chino
  • Barrio Chino